Texas Southern’s ‘Ocean Band’ Has Rich, Inspiring Legacy

HISTORY OF TEXAS SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY BAND

“FROM RAGS TO RICHES”

The Actual Story as Told by People Who Were There

by Mrs. Esther Franklin Nelson

PART 1.  1945 – 1950

The band at Texas Southern University was organized at Houston College for Negroes during the school year of 1945 – 1946.  At this time, the veterans were returning from World War II.  Many were also enrolling into this new school of higher education.

Mr. Allen E. Norton, acting Dean at that time, requested a list of at least twenty-five (25) names so that a college band could be added to the extracurricular activities.  Upon this request, thirty – five (35) interested musicians organized the first band of this institution.  Conrad Johnson was contacted to serve as the Band Director.

Our major performance was for the Spring Commencement Services of which I was a member of this class.  Due to a lack of proper equipment and instruments, I was asked by the Band Director of accompany the band on the Precessional, “The War March of the Priest”.  Because of our interest shown at this affair, we received a hearty welcome.

The following September, we marched from what is now Ryan Junior High School to the newly built Fairchild Building.  Also, Houston College for Negroes had acquired a new name, Texas State University for Negroes.  More veterans and other students had enrolled and as a result, the band grew.

 PART 2.  1950 – 1964

Due to the loss of files because of moving transactions to another edifice, we were unable to trace most of the Band’s activities during this period.  In the meanwhile, while we are still making effort to “bridge the gap”, we have a little bit of information about this period.  During this period, Texas Southern University Band male members applied and received a charter of Kappa Kappa Psi, National Honorary Band Fraternity for College Bandsmen.  Also, during this period, a charter was applied for and received of Tau Beta Sigma, National Honorary Band Sorority for College Bandswomen.  We have found out that at least three new directors have served during this period.  They were James Hill Lark, Jr. (director when the Kappa Kappa Psi Chapter was received), Jack C. Bradley (later head of the Music Department of Texas Southern University), and Campbell A. Talbert (presently on the faculty of the Music Department in 1972).  Efforts are still being made to find out additional information about this period of band history.  We plan to get on record, a complete band history and the rest of this section will be added at a later date, if possible.

 PART 3. 1965 – 1972

BAND, TAKE THE FIELD!!!

By Vinola Loyce Nelson

Welcome one and all to the greatest half time show of the ages.  Shortly, not only will you see, but you will hear some talented musicians who will entertain you.  So, don’t go away, or you’ll miss the show of all shows – - – - presenting, THE TIGER BAND OF T.S.U. LAND! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

Believe it or not, this was how the band was introduced at every performance.  The drum major would run onto the field with a battered baton and a whistle of some sort.  We would blow the whistle, which sounded like a toy horn at a New Years Eve’s Party.  Coming onto the field, playing “Everything’s Coming Up Roses”, the Tiger Band pranced.  The announcer was right – - – hilarious entertainment, a comedy show you’d never forget, unbelievable performances with tremendous action.

First, you’d see a group of girls representing majorettes.  They carried, and dropped quite often, batons of many shining colors – - red, blue, silver, and gold.  They wore white knee high boots, short skirts with blouses.  However, the head majorette wore maroon one piece outfits of glimmering fabric.

Next to enter the field were two rows of people playing woodwind instruments.  Alongside, forming a third row, were drummers beating drums of all sorts, sizes, shapes, and colors.  The bass drum, with its muffled sound, was flanked on both sides by two pairs of cracked cymbals, polished with a little rust for glamour.  Behind the percussion section, the blaring tubas marched, bringing with them the trumpets, the baritone horns, and a french horn.

Most of the band would wear the remainder of the maroon and gray uniforms which had seen their better and brighter days.  Most of the uniforms had patches, pins and paper clips.  The patches were sewn to cover the unwelcomed holes, the pins and paper clips were used to fasten together the pants and coats.  The band hats were box shaped with a white leather strap that fastened under the chin.  A secret about most of the hats, they didn’t have a top, only the brim and a leather strap existed.

By the time “Everything’s Coming Up Roses” had ended, the majority of the viewers were clustered at the refreshment stands or concession stand buying such goodies as peanuts, popcorn, and cotton candy.  They remained at such places until the half time show was over.  The opposing band, by this time, was dying of laughter and ridicule.  Our Band Director, David Peters, could never be found until the “show” was over.

I will never forget the 1967 football season.  Mr. Peters decided that we would travel to Louisiana and show “Grambling’s band how its suppose to be done!”  He proceeded with his pep talk, which received a complete silent response from the band of some fifty pieces.  During this time, the growth of the band was stimulated by workstudy checks, amounting approximately $60.00 to $90.00 monthly, based on rehearsal scheduled from two to three hours daily.

At any rate, we started working on this “dynamic show” to be seen by all who attended that great game in Louisiana.  Again, we entered the field playing “Everything’s Coming Up Roses”.  From there, we’ve formed a stick-picture, representing a football player.  As we played the Enco Gasoline Theme Song, “Hold It Tiger,” the majorettes ran across the field with a huge brown football made of cardboard, drawn and painted by someone in the Art Department.  As the ball approached the player, one foot would kick it away.  The majorettes would run in a different direction at a much faster rate of speed.  This routine happened throughout the entire song.  The crowd’s reaction, absolutely impossible, couldn’t believe their eyes.  Following this spectacular event, we marched in squares to a tune called “Unsquared Dance”.  From these squares, we moved into block formation to complete our show with the dance routine — the tune?, none other that “Turkey In the Straw” (with a new name or different title, of course)  Again, where was our leader, Mr Peters, hiding in the midst of the crowd.

Our uniforms that season were a little difference.  The entire percussion section wore black shoes or tennis, black slacks, and maroon and black turtleneck shirts.  The rest of the band dressed as preciously stated.

The 1967 season included many other tricks and treats.  We were told to march from the Music Building to Jefferson Stadium.  As we started down Cleburne Street, dogs would bark, some tried to bite too, people would laugh and allow their children to throw garbage, tomatoes, and even raw eggs at us.  Some of us were hit by these items.  Believe me, we were all tired of being laughed at by the entire Southwestern Athletic Conference! (SWAC)  What could we do?  We tried, to no avail, talking to the band director about changing our shows, especially the music.

By the following season, 1968, we had been awarded new uniforms to encourage continual participation in the band.  They were a tremendous improvement over the uniforms of yesterday.  However, our hats resembled those worn by Milkmen with an added gray “feather” worn on top.  We carried one memory from the past, however, white socks and white shoes.  Added to our new dress code were white gloves.  These new uniforms gave us an incentive to keep trying, in spite of public harassment and ridicule.  We were determined that we wouldn’t be embarrassed any more.  Because of our rebellion, we weren’t allowed to march at the first few games.  Finally, our drum major, Kenneth Malveaux, and our staff of officers decided to chart our own half time show.  At that time, John Roberts and Harold Aytche, of Shreveport, were assigned to David Peters as graduate assistants.  Mr. Roberts, being a very devoted leader, tried everything in his power to help us.  He helped us by creating marching drills downfield, arranging music, and giving us hints for a dance routine.  The drum major showed us how we were to leave the field on drum rolls, breaking into a well known tune, arranged by Edward Lee Rose, a tuba player.  We were somewhat satisfied.

This show was a strong improvement over the others in the past.  At last, we were anxious to perform at half time for once.  Our moment finally came, Astrodome, Grambling vs Texas Southern University.  After we marched on the field, Ralph Yarborough was called onto the field to give a “thank you” speech.  He had prepared the longest “thank you” speech in quite a while, it lasted the entire time of our show.  After the speech, the band was ordered off the field by someone over the public address system.  Grambling’s football team had already begun warming up for the second half, in spite of us standing on the field.  Again, a voice ordered us off the field.  Downtrodden and angry, we walked off the field.  The audience laughed, threw paper at us and other things.  Finally, the last game of the season came, TSU vs PV.  This time, we performed our “well rehearsed” show.  We hit the jackpot, at last.  Instead of the audience’s boos and nays, we heard their cheering and screaming.  Our pride, for once, had come through.  At the close of the Spring 1969 Concert Season, we heard rumors of a new band director for the Fall Season.  Based upon the facts of the rumors, the man was a black man.  Of course, experience had taught us not to build our hopes too high.  Previous years, the same rumor raged throughout our ears and each time David Peters would return with his “Everything Coming Up Roses”.  To our great surprise, this was no longer a rumor, but the divine truth.  July 1969, we were proudly introduced to our “Black Moses” in our time of trouble, Mr. Benjamin J. Butler, II and the birth of the “Ocean of Soul”.  From that day to eternity, “Mr. Soul” will always have a special place in my heart and memory for his musical inspirations.

 

Thank you, “Ocean” for Taking the Field

by Harry L. Nelson, Jr.

 

Since the name “Ocean of Soul” was given to the Texas Southern University Band by a local radio show, talking about a mountain of soul for Houston, it has commanded the interest and attention of the public locally and nationally.  The flashy, pace setting, “Ocean of Soul” have appeared at numerous professional football games and recently, at the Battle of the Bands.  Also, in 1973, at this Battle of the Band performances, the “Ocean of Soul” revealed to the public, for the first time, its new band uniforms.  These uniforms were designed and represented the first class band, the “Ocean of Soul” band uniform is completely different from anyone else’s .

2014 HBCU Media Summit

Dallas, TX

 

HBCU Digest, an online publication devoted to cover news about black colleges, hosted the HBCU Media Summit in New Orleans ,the Birthplace of Jazz .

The two-day event, on Dillard University’s campus, featured a wide range of speakers who offered participants tips, strategies and advice on how best to use digital media, particularly social media to better communicate with students, alumni and HBCU supporters. Attendees also learned ways to develop relationships with other leaders of local and national media, and establish mutual expectations between reporters and institutions. 

Speakers included Dr. Yuri Milligan of Hampton University, Crystal deGregory, founder of HBCU Story Inc., and  Dillard’s president,  Dr. Walter Kimbrough, who is also known as the “Hip Hop Prez” and Roland Martin, host of NewsOneNow, on the TVOne Network.

The HBCU Media Summit concluded with the 4th Annual awards ceremony that crowned  Hampton University as the  ‘HBCU of the Year’ and several other awards were presented to students, faculty, sports programs and academic programs on different HBCU campuses.

*Search the hashtag #HBCUMediaWeek to see what attendees were talking about on social media*

Join Kelly Price in supporting the Tom Joyner Foundation

 Join Kelly Price in supporting the Tom Joyner Foundation

Grammy-nominated songstress, Kelly Price, shows her support for the Tom Joyner Foundation. Join in her support and listen below.

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You can make a donation to support our efforts of Keeping Scholars in School here.

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You’re Invited! Join the Tom Joyner Foundation in support of Huston-Tillotson University.

Click below to donate now and confirm your

attendance.

Pre-Juneteenth Wine Event to Discover HT!

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The Tom Joyner Foundation and Huston-Tillotson University are hosting a “Pre-Juneteenth Wine Event to Discover HT!” to help raise money for scholarships and books for students. The event will take place 6:00 p.m., June 16 at the Huston-Tillotson University Library, 900 Chicon St., in Austin, Texas.  Tax-deductible donations are $50.00 per person. You can make the donation by clicking on the “Donate Now” button below.

Huston-Tillotson will be the Foundation’s July “School of the Month”. The event is open to all past HT supporters, alumni and Austin area residents as well as business leaders, community dignitaries, elected officials, religious leaders and social/professional organizations.

For more information, please contact Jachel Redmond at jachel.redmond@tomjoynerfoundation.org.

About the Tom Joyner Foundation The Tom Joyner Foundation (http://tomjoynerfoundation.org) was founded in 1998 as the brainchild of nationally syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner. The mission of the Foundation is to support historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) with scholarships, endowments and capacity-building enhancements. The Foundation has provided necessary support to every HBCU in its 16-year history to help sustain and preserve the legacies of these valuable institutions. Through fundraising and donor development initiatives, $65 million has been raised to support more than 29,000 students attending HBCUs. Additionally, then Foundation has recommended internships, offered matching grant support, and career development to deserving students.  You can follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

About Huston-Tillotson University: Huston–Tillotson University is a historically black university in Austin, Texas, United States. The school is affiliated with the United Methodist Church, the United Church of Christ, and the United Negro College Fund. Huston–Tillotson University awards four-year degrees in business, education, the humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, science and technology. The University also offers alternative teacher certification and academic programs for undergraduates interested in pursuing post-graduate degrees in Law and Medicine.

Pre-Juneteenth Wine Event to Discover HT!

Texas Southern University “Bring It” Pledge Form

Tiger Pride Image r1b 280x300 Texas Southern University Bring It Pledge Form

Complete the form below to make a pledge and “Bring It!” to the  Texas Southern University National Alumni Association 2014 Convention in Dallas (July 31st through August 3rd).

Texas Southern University National Alumni Association Launches “Bring It!” Campaign

Tiger Pride Image r1b 280x300 Texas Southern University National Alumni Association Launches Bring It! Campaign

Texas Southern University National Alumni Association “Bring It” Campaign!!!

The Bring It Campaign is a challenge to all Texas Southern University alumni chapters to “Bring It” to the Texas Southern University National Alumni Association 2014 Convention in Dallas (July 31st through August 3rd). Each chapter is challenged to make a $1,000 or more donation in advance or bring to be presented at the convention. Participating chapter includes the Dallas, TX chapter (president- Mr. Bernard Clark) and the Texas Southern University National Alumni Association (president- Ms. Julia Askew-Mills). Texas Southern University has been named the Tom Joyner Foundation June 2014 school of the month. As a Tom Joyner Foundation ‘School of the Month’, efforts are focused on raising scholarship funds for Texas Southern University and its students.

Tom Joyner has a message to alumni. Listen below.

Make a Pledge

Here’s your chance to make a pledge and “Bring It!” to the  Texas Southern University National Alumni Association 2014 Convention in Dallas (July 31st through August 3rd). A list of pledges will be posted online and at the National Convention. Click on the button below to complete the pledge form. You can also make your donation now. See options below.

PledgeButton e1401479349481 Texas Southern University National Alumni Association Launches Bring It! Campaign

“Bring It!” - Choose Your Amount!

We’re trying to generate donations from as many supporters as possible at whatever level you’re most comfortable. So, please click on the button below to make a donation to support TSU.

Texas Southern University National Alumni Association 'Bring It' Campaign


Benefits of making a $5,000 donation.

Texas Southern University National Alumni Association 'Bring It' Campaign


Benefits of making a $2,500 donation.

Texas Southern University National Alumni Association 'Bring It' Campaign


Benefits of making a $1,000 donation.

Donations will be accepted by the Tom Joyner Foundation on behalf of Texas Southern University via www.tomjoynerfoundation.org or via mail with checks made payable to the Tom Joyner Foundation- P.O. Box 630495, Irving, TX, 75063. 100% of all donations received during this campaign will be forwarded to Texas Southern University to be used as fall 2014 scholarships for full time students enrolled at the University.

Please feel free to direct your questions to Ms. Loraine Green-Lee, College Partnerships and Planning Manager, 214-722-2825 or loraine.lee@tomjoynerfoundation.org or Marie Curtis, Dallas Chapter Coordinator for the “Bring It!” Campaign, 214- 392- 0965 or emariecurtis@yahoo.com

About the Tom Joyner Foundation The Tom Joyner Foundation (http://tomjoynerfoundation.org) was founded in 1998 as the brainchild of nationally syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner. The mission of the Foundation is to support historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) with scholarships, endowments, and capacity-building enhancements. The Foundation has provided necessary support to every HBCU in its 16-year history to help sustain and preserve the legacies of these valuable institutions. Through fundraising and donor development initiatives, $65 million has been raised to support more than 29,000 students attending HBCUs. Additionally, the Foundation has recommended internships, offered matching grant support, and career development to deserving students. You can follow the Foundation on Facebook and Twitter.

Tom Joyner Foundation, Denny’s Announce Winners of 2014 Hungry for Education Scholarship

Foundation, Denny’s are partners in the Hungry for Education Scholarship Program, awarding 10 outstanding students $2,500 scholarships 

The Tom Joyner Foundation and Denny’s Corporation (NASDAQ: DENN), franchisor and operator of one of America’s largest full-service restaurant chains, today announced the 10 students winners of the 2014 Hungry for Education Scholarship Program, a partnership between the two organizations that supports students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

Students at 10 participating HBCUs submitted 250- to 500-word essays responding to the prompt “How can you or Denny’s have an impact on hunger in your HBCU’s community?”  The winners’ schools and hometowns are:

Timothy Baba, freshman, Huston-Tillotson University, from Austin, Texas

Alexandria Brown, junior, Florida A&M University, from Tallahasee, Fla.

Sergio Butler, junior, Central State University, from Chicago, Ill.

Tarryn Delyons, freshman, Claflin University, from Columbia, SC

Diamond Giles, freshman, Norfolk State University, from Bowling Green,Va.

Alexis Rooks, sophomore, Clark Atlanta University, from Savannah, Ga.

Uriel Rose, freshman, Alabama State University, from Montgomery, Ala.

Ryan Taylor, freshman, Langston University, from Owasso, Okla.

Kiani Upshaw, junior, Southern University, from Gary, Ind.

Stephanie White, junior, Johnson C. Smith University, from Buffalo, N.Y.

Thomas Joyner Jr., president and chief executive officer of the Foundation, s aid he was impressed with the students’ ideas.  “Each of these students have come up with very good ideas,” he said. “You can tell they put a lot of thought into these projects.

April Kelly-Drummond, Denny’s director of corporate diversity and community affairs, said, “At Denny’s, we are committed to providing the tools and resources students need succeed in all educational endeavors, while still making a difference in the lives of others. Each and every one of this year’s Hungry for Education Scholarship program winners demonstrate that shared commitment, both to their communities and to ending childhood hunger. Thanks to the Tom Joyner Foundation, our partner of more than a decade, Denny’s hopes that by awarding these scholarship to deserving students, we can all look ahead to a future where childhood hunger is a thing of the past.”

Each scholarship recipient exemplified a desire to end hunger in their communities through creative thinking and actionable ideas. For example, Diamond Giles at Norfolk State recommends creating the “Spartan Food Pantry” that would include a garden providing fresh fruits and vegetables to deserving students, faculty and local residents. Uriel Rose of Alabama State offered a multi-tiered approach to ending hunger, including an awareness campaign, a food drive and creating a “local hunger action group” that would work with local churches and other community groups to assist the hungry and homeless. Alexis Rooks of Clark Atlanta suggests that the four schools in the Atlanta Universities Center (including Clark Atlanta, Spelman, Morehouse and Morris Brown) partner with Denny’s to renovate one of the neighborhood’s vacant buildings into a kitchen/pantry to help feed the hungry in the area.

About the Tom Joyner Foundation:

The Tom Joyner Foundation (http://tomjoynerfoundation.org) was founded in 1998 as the brainchild of nationally syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner. The mission of the Foundation is to support historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) with scholarships, endowments and capacity-building enhancements. The Foundation has provided necessary support to every HBCU in its 16-year history to help sustain and preserve the legacies of these valuable institutions. Through fundraising and donor development initiatives, $65 million has been raised to support more than 29,000 students attending HBCUs. Additionally, the Foundation has recommended internships, offered matching grant support, and career development to deserving students. You can follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

About Denny’s Corp.

Denny’s is one of America’s largest full-service family restaurant chains, currently operating 1,700 franchised, licensed and company-owned restaurants across the United States, Canada, Costa Rica, Mexico, Honduras, Guam, Puerto Rico and New Zealand. For further information on Denny’s, including news releases, please visit the Denny’s website at www.dennys.comand www.dennysdiversity.com.

Connect with Denny’s

For news and updates on Denny’s please visit the brand’s social channels via Facebook, Twitter, tumblr, Pinterest or YouTube.

Tom Joyner Foundation, Denny’s Announce Winners of 2014 Hungry for Education Scholarship

 

HungryForEducation LOGO e1368550387155 Tom Joyner Foundation, Denny’s Announce Winners of 2014 Hungry for Education Scholarship

 

Foundation, Denny’s are partners in the Hungry for Education Scholarship Program, awarding 10 outstanding students $2,500 scholarships

 DALLASMay 1, 2014 – The Tom Joyner Foundation and Denny’s Corporation (NASDAQ: DENN), franchisor and operator of one of America’s largest full-service restaurant chains, today announced the 10 winners of the 2014 Hungry for Education Scholarship Program, a partnership between the two organizations that supports students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

Students at 10 participating HBCUs submitted 250- to 500-word essays responding to the prompt “How can you or Denny’s have an impact on hunger in your HBCU’s community?”  The winners’ schools and hometowns are:

Timothy Baba, freshman, Huston-Tillotson University, from Austin, Texas

Alexandria Brown, junior, Florida A&M University, from Tallahasee, Fla.

Sergio Butler, junior, Central State University, from Chicago, Ill.

Tarryn Delyons, freshman, Claflin University, from Columbia, SC

Diamond Giles, freshman, Norfolk State University, from Bowling Green,Va.

Alexis Rooks, sophomore, Clark Atlanta University, from Savannah, Ga.

Uriel Rose, freshman, Alabama State University, from Montgomery, Ala.

Ryan Taylor, freshman, Langston University, from Owasso, Okla.

Kiani Upshaw, junior, Southern University, from Gary, Ind.

Stephanie White, junior, Johnson C. Smith University, from Buffalo, N.Y.

Thomas Joyner Jr., president and chief executive officer of the Foundation, s aid he was impressed with the students’ ideas.  “Each of these students have come up with very good ideas,” he said. “You can tell they put a lot of thought into these projects.”

April Kelly-Drummond, Denny’s director of corporate diversity and community affairs, said, “At Denny’s, we are committed to providing the tools and resources students need succeed in all educational endeavors, while still making a difference in the lives of others. Each and every one of this year’s Hungry for Education Scholarship program winners demonstrate that shared commitment, both to their communities and to ending childhood hunger. Thanks to the Tom Joyner Foundation, our partner of more than a decade, Denny’s hopes that by awarding these scholarship to deserving students, we can all look ahead to a future where childhood hunger is a thing of the past.”

Each scholarship recipient exemplified a desire to end hunger in their communities through creative thinking and actionable ideas. For example:

  • Diamond Giles at Norfolk State recommends creating the “Spartan Food Pantry” that would include a garden providing fresh fruits and vegetables to deserving students, faculty and local residents.
  • Uriel Rose of Alabama State offered a multi-tiered approach to ending hunger, including an awareness campaign, a food drive and creating a “local hunger action group” that would work with local churches and other community groups to assist the hungry and homeless.
  • Alexis Rooks of Clark Atlanta suggests that the four schools in the Atlanta Universities Center (including Clark Atlanta, Spelman, Morehouse and Morris Brown) partner with Denny’s to renovate one of the neighborhood’s vacant buildings into a kitchen/pantry to help feed the hungry in the area.

About the Tom Joyner Foundation:

The Tom Joyner Foundation (http://tomjoynerfoundation.org) was founded in 1998 as the brainchild of nationally syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner. The mission of the Foundation is to support historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) with scholarships, endowments and capacity-building enhancements. The Foundation has provided necessary support to every HBCU in its 16-year history to help sustain and preserve the legacies of these valuable institutions. Through fundraising and donor development initiatives, $65 million has been raised to support more than 29,000 students attending HBCUs. Additionally, the Foundation has recommended internships, offered matching grant support, and career development to deserving students. You can follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

About Denny’s Corp.

Denny’s is one of America’s largest full-service family restaurant chains, currently operating 1,700 franchised, licensed and company-owned restaurants across the United States, Canada, Costa Rica, Mexico, Honduras, Guam, Puerto Rico and New Zealand. For further information on Denny’s, including news releases, please visit the Denny’s website at www.dennys.comand www.dennysdiversity.com.

Connect with Denny’s

For news and updates on Denny’s please visit the brand’s social channels via Facebook, Twitter, tumblr, Pinterest or YouTube.

Tom Joyner Foundation Names Central State May School of the Month

CentralState 214x300 Tom Joyner Foundation Names Central State May School of the Month

Click here to make a donation to Central State University. 

The Tom Joyner Foundation is recognizing Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio, as the May 2014 School of the Month.

Listen below to an interview with Central State president, Dr. Cynthia Jackson-Hammond.

The foundation, formed by the nationally syndicated radio personality, chose Central State as part of its on-going effort to assist these institutions in broadening and strengthening their efforts to raise money to help keep students attending HBCUs.

With a legacy of over 125 years, Central State University is one of the oldest historically black universities. The university has fostered a legacy of academic and athletic achievements and is home to the nationally renowned Central State University Chorus, which has twice been nominated for a Grammy.

Student success is evident as Central State has been named an Ohio Center of Excellence in Emerging Technologies and an Ohio Center in Societal and Cultural Transformation. The university has also been recognized for its Pre-law program and manufacturing engineering program, which has a 100 percent job placement rate.

Central State offers a broad curriculum with over 30 bachelor’s degree programs and graduate programs in education. The opportunities offered at Central State prepare its students to become leaders for the future and beyond.

As one of the Tom Joyner Foundation ‘Schools of the Month’, each school will be promoted by the Tom Joyner Morning Show and receive those funds raised from listeners, alumni and other interested parties that month. The show, aired in 115 markets around the country, reaches nearly eight million listeners every week.

The Foundation’s ‘Schools of the Month’ for the rest of the year are as follows: June- Texas Southern University, Houston, TX; July- Huston-Tillotson University, Austin, TX; August – Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta,GA; September- Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA; October- Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL; November – Southern University and A&M College, Baton Rouge, LA.

Click here to make a donation to Central State University. 

Tom Joyner Foundation Received $15,000 in Donations from Langston University Alumni for “School of the Month” Campaign

Alumni raise money to help underwrite scholarships, recruit students from Oklahoma

photo 213x300 Tom Joyner Foundation Received $15,000 in Donations from  Langston University Alumni for “School of the Month” CampaignThe Tom Joyner Foundation received $15,000 in donations from Langston University alumni supporting the April “School of the Month” campaign

During today’s nationally syndicated Tom Joyner Morning Show, Venora W. McKinney, president of the Langston University National Alumni Association, announced its $5,000 donation. Vonnie Ware Roberts, president of the university’s Oklahoma City alumni chapter, donated $10,000.  Click here to listen lo the alumni donations.

“We are so proud to be part of the School of the Month for April,” McKinney said when presenting the donation. “Langston is an unusually deserving institution.”

Roberts said, “We are excited about this. We’ll use these funds to recruit students from the Oklahoma area.”

Alfonzo Drain, chair of the alumni association’s scholarship committee, said, “Last year, we awarded more than $15,000 in scholarships. … We’re hoping alumni will be motivated to give.”

Leon Bragg, president-elect, Langston University National Alumni Association, “I would like to encourage especially all the graduates to show your pride and joy by going to the Tom-Joyner-Foundation-Dot-Org to and supporting Langston University. … It shouldn’t be so difficult for you to recall when you were a student. So, please, reach out.”

Established in 1897, Langston University is the only historically black institution of higher education in the state of Oklahoma. A four-year, state-supported, land-grant, regional institution, it has an average enrollment of approximately 3,000 students on campuses located in Langston, Tulsa, and Oklahoma City. The University is a member of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA).

As one of the Tom Joyner Foundation ‘Schools of the Month’, each school will be promoted by the Tom Joyner Morning Show and receive those funds raised from listeners, alumni and other interested parties that month. The show, aired in 115 markets around the country, reaches nearly eight million listeners.

For more information, contact Neil Foote, media relations, Tom Joyner Foundation, neil@neilfoote.com, 214.448.3765.  To make a donation to Langston, click on the “Donate” button on TomJoynerFoundation.org.