North Carolina Central University Lab Works on Earthquake Detection

 

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North Carolina Central University Lab Works on Earthquake Detection

 WHAT:  A seismic recording station on North Carolina Central University’s (NCCU) campus is linked to the Center for Earthquake Research and Information at the University of Memphis and monitored by students and faculty in NCCU’s Department of Environmental, Earth and Geospatial Sciences.

WHO:             Gordana Vlahovic, Ph.D.

Chair of NCCU’s Department of Environmental, Earth and Geospatial Sciences

Enrico Brandmayr, Ph.D.

Native of Italy and post-doctoral fellow

Brandmayr is currently studying North American intraplate seismicity under a $5 million grant NCCU received from the National Science Foundation Center for Research Excellence in Science and Technology.

 

WHEN:          Vlahovic and Brandmayr are available.

WHERE:       North Carolina Central University

                        Mary Townes Science Building

1900 Concord St.

Durham, North Carolina 27707

 

The Department of Environmental, Earth and Geospatial Science master’s degree in Earth Science is unique in the Triangle Region of North Carolina. Students complete their coursework in the evenings at a rate of three courses per semester. The goal of the Earth Sciences program is to teach skills and methods that are used in analyzing and understanding the Earth’s physical properties and environment and how human activities alter those conditions – a field of science that is quickly growing.